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Posts for tag: teething

By Mendelson Family Dentistry, PA
April 23, 2019
Category: Oral Health
DontUseBenzocaineProductstoEaseYourBabysTeethingPain

Although teething is a natural part of your baby's dental development, it can be quite uncomfortable for them—and upsetting to you. During teething, children can experience symptoms like pain, drooling or irritability.

Teething is the two or three-year process of intermittent episodes of the primary ("baby") teeth moving through the gums. These episodes are like storms that build up and then subside after a few days. Your aim as a parent is to help your baby get through the "stormiest" times with as little discomfort as possible. To that end you may have considered using over-the-counter products that temporarily numb irritated gums.

Some of those numbing products, however, contain a pain reliever called benzocaine. In recent years, this and similar ingredients have been found to increase the level of a protein called methemoglobin in the bloodstream. Too much methemoglobin can result in less oxygen delivered to body tissues, a condition known as methemoglobinemia.

This oxygen decrease can cause shortness of breath, fatigue or dizziness. In its severest form it could lead to seizures, coma or even death. Children and infants are at high risk for benzocaine-induced methemoglobinemia, which is why the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has banned marketing for benzocaine products as pain relievers for teething infants and children.

Fortunately, there are alternatives for helping your child weather teething episodes. A clean, chilled (not frozen) teething ring or pacifier, or a cold, wet washcloth can help numb gum pain. You can also massage their gums with a clean finger to help counteract the pressure exerted by an emerging tooth. Be sure, though, that you're not allowing anything in your child's mouth like lead-based paint that could be toxic. And under no circumstances should you use substances containing alcohol.

For severe pain, consult your physician about using a pain reliever like acetaminophen or ibuprofen, and the proper dosage for your child. With these tips you can help your child safely pass through a teething episode.

If you would like more information on helping your child cope with teething discomfort, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation.

By Mendelson Family Dentistry, PA
February 02, 2017
Category: Oral Health
Tags: teething  
TakeTheseActionstoMakeYourChildMoreComfortableDuringTeething

Teething is an important phase in your baby's dental maturity. During the approximate two-year process, they will acquire their first set of teeth.

It can also be an unpleasant two years as each tooth sequentially breaks through the gums. The severity of teething problems differs with each child, but there are common signs: irritability, biting and gnawing, chin rash, drooling or ear rubbing among them. Although for most babies the discomfort isn't that great, the pain can occasionally be a lot for them — and their care-givers — to handle.

Although having a very unhappy infant can be nerve-jangling, there's no real cause for concern health-wise. If, however, they begin to run a fever or experience diarrhea, that could be a sign of something more serious. In those cases, you should see a doctor as soon as possible.

Otherwise, there are some things you can do to make them more comfortable during teething episodes. One thing to remember: cold items for biting or gnawing usually work wonders. So, be sure you have chilled teething rings or pacifiers (but not frozen — the extreme temperature could burn their gums). For older children, an occasional cold food like a popsicle can bring relief.

You can also try massaging the gums with your clean finger, which will help counteract the pressure of an erupting tooth. But avoid rubbing alcohol or aspirin on the gums, and you shouldn't apply numbing agents to children less than two years of age unless advised by your doctor.

If their pain persists, it's permissible to give them a mild pain reliever like the appropriate dosage for their age of baby acetaminophen or ibuprofen. Again, you should give this by mouth and avoid rubbing it on the gums.

By the time they're three, all their primary teeth should be in and teething symptoms should have largely dissipated. In the meantime, make them as comfortable as you can â?? in no time the unpleasantness of teething will pass.

If you would like more information on coping with your child's teething, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Teething Troubles: How to Help Keep your Baby Comfortable.”

By Mendelson Family Dentistry, PA
January 16, 2014
Category: Oral Health
Tags: teething  
HelpingYourBabyCopeWiththeDiscomfortofTeething

When your baby’s first teeth erupt in the mouth, it’s a big step in their development. Unfortunately, you may not have much opportunity to celebrate — you’re too busy tending to your infant whose experience is anything but pleasant.

Commonly known as teething, the eruption process usually begins between six and nine months of age, although some children may begin as early as three months or as late as twelve. Not all teeth come in at the same time: it usually begins with the two lower front teeth, then the two upper front teeth, followed by the molars and then the canines (eye teeth). By age three, most children have all twenty of their primary teeth.

Each child’s teething experience is different and may vary in length of time and intensity. The usual signs are heightened irritability, biting and gnawing accompanied by gum swelling, ear rubbing, drooling and sometimes facial rashes. Babies also may have disturbed sleeping patterns and a decreased appetite. Occasionally, this discomfort can be intense.

There are some things you can do to ease this discomfort. Provide your baby a clean, chilled (not frozen) rubber teething ring, chilled pacifier or wet washcloth to gnaw on. Cold foods, like popsicles for older children can also be soothing, though you should limit sugary foods to lower the risk of tooth decay. You can also finger massage swollen gums to counteract the pressure coming from the erupting tooth, or administer pain relievers like baby acetaminophen or ibuprofen. You can use products with Benzocaine®, a numbing agent, for children two years or older — but you should never use alcohol for children of any age for inflamed gums.

Be sure to also set up a Year One dental examination around their first birthday. This is an important first step in your child’s long-term dental care, and a good opportunity to check their teething progress. And, by all means, if you have concerns about your child’s experience with teething, don’t hesitate to call our office.

Teething is a normal part of your child’s development. There’s much you can do to help make it as comfortable and pain-free as possible.

If you would like more information on teething, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Teething Troubles.”



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